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Tuesday, 25 June 2019

17 Identical Boys In single Pregnancy.

Did a Woman Give Birth to 17 Children at Once?





The viral post was shared by Richard Camarinta Dy on May 30. It has already been shared by more than 33,000 users at the time of filing this story.

An unbelievable story claiming that a woman in the United States gave birth to 17 identical boys in a single pregnancy is doing the rounds on social media. The viral post has three images and a story written to it. One of the photos shows a woman with an abnormally swollen belly, and the other two show many babies the third one features a man too.




The post, put up by Facebook user Richard Camarinta Dy, says that one Catherine Bridge holds the World Record for delivering the most babies in one pregnancy.
The tale of a woman named Catherine Bridge, who supposedly “holds the World Record for the most babies in a lone pregnancy by giving birth to 17 babies,” has been making the rounds of social media since 2014:

Of course, this account did not originate with any real incident or news report, but with a 20 January 2014 article published by World News Daily Report (WNDR), a notorious purveyor of junk news:
USA: MOTHER GIVES BIRTH TO 17 BABIES AT ONCE!

An American woman has totally annihilated the former World Record for the most babies in a lone pregnancy by giving birth to seventeen babies over 29 hours last weekend at the Indianapolis Memorial Hospital.

Catherine Bridges and her husband had been trying to have a child for many years and had decided last year to use medical assistance from a fertility clinic in Rhodes Island.




The insemination process was definitely successful, as the couple got an entire litter of seventeen beautiful and identical boys.
The original WNDR article included only the photograph of 17 blue-clothed babies shown above; someone latter embellished the social media version by adding a (manipulated) image of a pregnant woman and a picture of a man sitting on a sofa amidst a multitude of diaper-clad infants.

The record for most surviving children produced in a single pregnancy remains eight, a feat accomplished in 2009 by Nadya Suleman, more commonly known as “Octomom.” (A few instances of the live birth of nine children stemming from a single pregnancy have been recorded, but those children all died shortly afterwards.
The viral post was shared by Richard Camarinta Dy on May 30. It has already been shared by more than 33,000 users at the time of filing this story.

In the post, Richard Camarinta Dy also shared the article link from a website called Women Daily Magazine, which describes the same story.

But it is clearly mentioned in the article that the viral story is fictional, taken from another article in a website called World News Daily Report’.

World News Daily Report is a satirical fake news website which publishes cooked-up stories for fun.




Also watch: It's time to Birthday of Karishma Kapoor


Multiple birth


A multiple birth is the culmination of one multiple pregnancy, wherein the mother delivers two or more offspring. A term most applicable to placental species, multiple births occur in most kinds of mammals, with varying frequencies. Such births are often named according to the number of offspring, as in twins and triplets. In non-humans, the whole group may also be referred to as a litter, and multiple births may be more common than single births. Multiple births in humans are the exception and can be exceptionally rare in the largest mammals.




A multiple pregnancy may be the result of the fertilization of a single egg that then splits to create identical fetuses, or it may be the result of the fertilization of multiple eggs that create fraternal fetuses, or it may be a combination of these factors. A multiple pregnancy from a single zygote is called monozygotic, from two zygotes is called dizygotic, or from three or more zygotes is called polyzygotic. Similarly, the siblings themselves from a multiple birth may be referred to as monozygotic if they are identical or as polyzygotic if they are fraternal.

Each fertilized egg (zygote) may produce a single embryo, or it may split into two or more embryos, each carrying the same genetic material. Fetuses resulting from different zygotes are called fraternal and share only 50% of their genetic material, as ordinary full siblings from separate births do. Fetuses resulting from the same zygote share 100% of their genetic material and hence are called identical. Identical twins are always the same sex, except in cases of Klinefelter syndrome

List of multiple births



This is a list of multiple births, consisting of notable higher order (4+) multiple births and pregnancies. Twins and triplets are sufficiently common to have their own separate articles. With the use of reproductive technology such as fertility drugs and in vitro fertilization (IVF) such births have become increasingly common. This list contains only multiple births which have some claim to notability, such as being the first recorded in a country, the first to survive to adulthood in a country, or the heaviest, lightest or longest lived (globally).






Twin Pregnancy Facts You Need to Know




The twin birth rate in the United States is about 33 in 1000, compared to about 19 in 1000 during the early 1980s. That's because there are growing numbers of older moms (hormonal changes are believed to be responsible for the release of more than one egg at ovulation) and more successful fertility treatments. Here are some other facts about twin pregnancies that you might not know, from Pregnancy Day by Day editor-in-chief Maggie Blott, M.B., B.S.; and consultant editor Paula Amato, M.D




  • Research shows that 10 percent to 15 percent of all singleton births may have started off as twins; often one is lost early in pregnancy in a phenomenon known as "vanishing twin syndrome."
  • There are two types of twins: fraternal and identical. Identical twins are less common than fraternal because identical twins require the splitting of a single fertilized egg, which is rare. Fraternal twins occur when two separate eggs are fertilized by two separate sperm and implant in the womb at the same time.
  • The odds of having identical twins are about 1 in 250.
  • If you've had nonidentical, or fraternal, twins (the result when two eggs are released at ovulation and both are fertilized) without having taken fertility drugs, your chance of having a second set is about 1 in 3,000.
  • More than half of twins are born before 37 weeks; plan your maternity leave accordingly so you don't leave your employer in the lurch.
  • The likelihood that you'll have twins is greater if there is a history of twins in your family. Fertility drugs also increase the incidence of twins because they often cause the release of more than one egg during ovulation.



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